The 'Ramsgate Piper' Butterfly


E. vashti (MS), Eurytela hiarbas f.vashti

The name 'vashti' was taken from the Bible, the book of Esther Chapter 1: 9 through to Chapter 2: 4. Here the Queen Vashti refused a command from her king on two separate occasions to appear in her queen's headdress and her natural beauty before the people, so that they could admire her and praise their king. This refusal led the king to choosing another wife, named Esther, and banishing queen Vashti into exile. Our butterfly, Eurytela vashti (ms) is a very beautiful butterfly that, just like Queen Vashti, refuses to act according to the norm of the Eurytela family and is elusive, hiding herself in the undergrowth of the Ibilanghlolo Valley.

Discovery Of Vashti

In the Namphalidae Family of butterflies is the Genus called EURYTELA consisting of two butterfly Species found on the South Coast of KZN.
Which one have you seen? (See Below)

The first four pics display the upperside view of the butterfly's wings and the second set of pics display the underside views. e.g. Pic 1. is the top side and pic 1a is the underside of pic 1

1. & 1a. This is the first common species found throughout Southern Africa, of the Genus Eurytela called dryope angulata in which the yellow-orange band will vary in thickness from specimen to specimen. This is referred to as a variatype. On the underside, the orange marking does not permeate through the wing as seen in 1a.

2. & 2a. This second species also found throughout southern Africa is also very common, of the Genus Eurytela called hiarbas angustata in which the white band does not vary in thickness from specimen to specimen. On the underside, the white marking does permeate through the wing as seen in 2a.

3. & 3a. This butterfly is believed to be a form of the second species found only on the South Coast, KZN and in dense forests of GAUTENG is extremely rare, of the Genus Eurytela called hiarbas angustata f. flavescens in which the yellow-orange band does not vary in thickness from specimen to specimen. On the underside, the yellow-orange marking does permeate through the wing as seen in 3a.

4. & 4a. This butterfly is also believed to be a form of the second species found only on the South Coast of KZN and is extremely rare, of the Genus Eurytela called hiarbas angustata f. vashti in which the red-brick-brown band does not vary in thickness from specimen to specimen. On the underside, the red-brick-brown marking does permeate through the wing as seen in 4a.

1. Upperside - male 2. Upperside - male 3. Upperside - male 4. Upperside - male
1a. Underside - male 2a. Underside - male 3a. Underside - male 4a. Underside - male
E. dryope angulata E. hiarbas angustata F. flavescens F. vashti
A very common butterfly species A very common butterfly species An extremely rare butterfly form An extremely rare butterfly form

Discovery Of Vashti

The discovery of the 'Ramsgate Piper' Eurytela vashti (MS)
Discovery of the first male of Eurytela vashti (ms), led us to the investigation of the Eurytela Genus. The first specimen seen and captured was in the “Ibilanghlolo Valley” along the “Little Billy” river on the 14th April 2002 by E. Whiteley. (Ref:1593 to 1594 of 2000 to 2003 Journal). This was a male (Eurytela vashti ms). E. Whiteley says: “I had never seen anything quite like this specimen, with its rustic brown wing band, found only on the hindwing upperside. I mistakenly identified this butterfly as Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. flavescens. Because of its poor condition I believed it to be an aberration of Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. flavescens. This specimen was darting in and out of the branchlets of the undergrowth near the existing Lepidome, which we had first built.

Vashti... A New Specie?

Is the Ramsgate Piper a NEW Species?
It is of the opinion from several experts that it definitely is a new species. On the other hand it is the opinion of others that it could be, but they are too afraid to make the commitment due to there being so few specimens for examination. So scientifically, the butterfly remains undecided as a new species or a form. However, for the sake of this unusual and extremely rare butterfly it will remain a form of Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. vashti.fo@sabba.co.za

History Of Vashti

History of'Ramsgate Piper' E. vashti (MS) - VS - E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens.
The first specimen (a male) ever discovered was by a Mr A. Ross in Durban in 1900 and can be viewed in the "”Pennington's Butterflies of Southern Africa" book on page 539, plate 100 and described by C.G.C. Dickson. (and incorrectly described as a form called E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens). There were no other specimens available for comparison, study and verification.

The second specimen (a female) was discovered by Mr. C.W. Wykeham in 1958 and can be viewed from a small pocket book called “What Butterfly is that?” by C.G.C. Dickson and published by Purnell Pocketbook in 1972, on page 33, subheading 25 Eurytela hiarbas angustata. This specimen was taken in Umkomaas along the South Coast of Durban and was mistaken for the butterfly E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens. As there were only these two specimens, it was assumed that they are male and female.

The next three specimens (all females) were discovered by Deryck Earle Whiteley between the periods of 1973 to 1990 in Durban on the Bluff . These specimens were left in the care of the Durban Museum. On verification it was established that all three specimens were females and corresponded in appearance and coloration to the female caught in 1958 by C.W. Wykeham (see main photograph). These females were classed and assumed to be E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens, along with the description of the specimen of Mr. C.W. Wykeham.

So now there was 1 male specimen, E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens, that looked like the picture above in 3 & 3a. And there were four females that looked like the main photograph above.

Another specimen that came to light (female) was loaned to Ivor Migdoll by Dr. D.A. Swanepoel, for his book "Field Guide to the Butterflies of Southern Africa”. This specimen can be seen on page 59 picture 59c, which is a female and not a male as described. This being the first female of E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens. No notice was taken, as this specimen looked like the male discovered by Mr. A Ross. (for a comparison look at 3 & 3a)

So, un-noticed by all the experts sitting in museums and collectors alike there is as follows; 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens male, 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens female and 4 other strange looking females (see main photograph)

In July of 2001, another Eurytela specimen was discovered in the Ibilanghlolo Valley by E. Whiteley. This specimen was compared to the specimen in “What Butterfly is that?” by C.G.C. Dickson and published by Purnell Pocketbook in 1972, on page 33 and identified as E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens by E. Whiteley. Then a few days later a tattered male was taken in more or less the same area as the previous female. It had unusually dark markings that were of an red-brick-brown nature in color. It was decided that, being a worn and tattered specimen, led to the belief that it was an aberration coloration. (see 4. & 4a.)

Now we have as follows; 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens male, 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens female and 5 other strange looking females (see main photograph) and 1x presumed aberration male (see 4. & 4a)

In the following year, a E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) was netted at Margate (South Coast) by E. Whiteley, another E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) was netted in Trafalgar by E. Whiteley. Another E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) at Margate (South Coast) by E. Whiteley, again E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) at Mboyti Forrest (Eastern Cape) by E. Whiteley, yet another E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) specimen at Oribi Gorge KZN by E. Whiteley, between May 2001 and March 2002.

Now we have; 6x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens males (see 3. &3a.), 1x E. hiarbas angustata f.flavescens female and 5 other strange looking females (see main photograph) and 1x presumed aberration male (see 4. & 4a)

Then, on the 14 April of 2002, 2x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (males) were caught by Earle Whiteley and 2 x specimens of the aberration (the same as the one caught in July 2001) in the Ibilanghlolo Valley by Earle Whiteley. The specimens were mounted so that when dried, a proper study could be conducted by D.E. Whiteley and E. Whiteley.

Now we have; 8x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens males (see 3. &3a.), 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens female and 5 other strange looking females (see main photograph) and 3x presumed aberration male (see 4. & 4a)

On the 24th April of 2002, a group of us went to Trafalgar, South Coast, KZN; Richard Dobson and his wife, daughter Collette Dobson, Chantal Meyer, George Van Der Merwe and E. Whiteley. 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (male) was caught by Earle Whiteley and 2 x fresh specimens of the aberration (the same as the one caught in July 2001) and 1x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens female (seen in the main photograph) by E. Whiteley at a boom gate outside of Impenjati Nature Reserve in a dense Lantana forest. All specimens were netted by E. Whiteley, (of which a specimen was given to Richard Dobson for his daughters' small collection - under duress of friendship). It was a time of great excitement as E. Whiteley realized that this was not an aberration but the (male) of something new. Everyone else present became exited at the realization that E. Whiteley had discovered something new. It was probably the reaction that E. Whiteley had and his jubilance at what was discovered that sparked the excitement in those present, realizing that here was something big. You have to be a butterfly person with some rudimentary knowledge of butterflies to understand what took place - the excitement and the fame of what collectors dream of.


Thought to be aberration (male) The strange looking female

Now we have; 9x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens males (see 3. &3a.), 2x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens females and 5 other strange looking females (see main photograph) and 7x presumed aberration male (see 4. & 4a)

On the same day, a staff member, running the craft shop, netted a strange looking female, (as seen in the main photograph), slightly worn on her food plant as she was busy laying eggs. He netted her and kept her captive. When E. Whiteley arrived at the Butterfly Sanctuary, he introduced the host plant into a breeding container hurriedly devised for her to lay eggs (hopefully). She laid a total of 148 eggs.

The very next day, Richard Dobson and his wife, daughter Collette Dobson, were visiting the Butterfly Sanctuary in the hope of having a word with E. Whiteley, who unfortunately was not present, but arrived shortly later on, to discover that Richard Dobson had netted a strange looking female at the Butterfly Sanctuary, who claimed that it was for his daughters' collection. There were some words between them. E. Whiteley felt that it was his discovery and that the Dobson's have overstepped the mark, without permission to net any specimens on the property. That special comradeship bond was lost.

We now have; 9x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens males (see 3. &3a.), 2x E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens females and 7 other strange looking females (see main photograph) and 7x presumed aberration male (see 4. & 4a)

Conclusion:
The butterfly E. vashti (ms) E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti, was discovered to be something new from the specimens recorded in Ramsgate by E. Whiteley. However, the first recorded specimen (1958) was the actual discovery of the butterfly. Even though it was mis-identified as E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens. Little or no actual research and study has been done on these two rare butterfly forms, due to the lack of available material at the time. Expert Steve Collins from Nairobi Butterfly Centre, and fundi on the Genus Eurytela, believes that E. vashti (ms) E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti and E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens are not forms as described, "but in actual fact new evolving species". He also feels strongly, that a breeding program must be set up ready, and in place, in the hope of a female E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens would one day be netted and bred. Those results of that particular breeding program "will prove the validity of both these rare forms to be independent species".

Uniqueness of the 'Ramsgate Piper' Eurytela vashti (MS)

  1. Flight pattern; Like E. hiarbas and E. dryope, it has a darting, zigzag flight pattern, intermittent by short gliding motions. However, unlike E. hiarbas and E. dryope, E. vashti (ms) does not venture into any strong sunlit areas. Preferring to stay in the denser parts of the forest, no more than twenty meters from the little rivers edge, E. vashti (ms) is found to settle frequently on small rotted fruits found on the forest floor, where it feeds on, which, unlike E. hiarbas and E. dryope, prefer to play in sunlit areas, settling on flowers fromtime to time to feed, and uses the forest edge as a hide and seek passage against predators. Hence, this has made E. vashti (ms), an elusive and seldom seen butterfly. This butterfly has a habit of flying approximately 300 to 700 mm off the ground in the undergrowth, but probably flies much higher too.

    Host plant; There are three small colonies where we have found this remarkable butterfly. All three colonies have an unusual stinging nettle, (creeper-type with very fine short hairs on the leaf and stem), similar to Laportia pendicularis or Tragia glabratra, but we have not been able to identify. A female laid a hundred and forty-eight eggs on this plant (this specimen caught by the craft shop staff member). Each egg was laid individually and was a light mother-of-pearl colour, covered in fine cilia. However, I must state that we did find two eggs, which were laid on the netting of the container. Our problem now arises from trying to identify the host plant of the butterfly. Tony Abbott was asked to identify the creeper-type stinging nettle, but was unable to do so. This left us with no identification of the host plant. We have subsequently found quite a number of the food plant which someone else called 'Obetia tenax', but I have no idea. We have established larger colonies using this climbing creeper on fences and in our breeding area, since its discovery.

Breeding of the 'Ramsgate Piper' Eurytela vashti (MS)

  1. Breeding ofthe 'Ramsgate Piper' Eurytela vashti(MS)
    First brood - April 2002. The hundred and forty-eight eggs darkened within two weeks of being laid. Great care was taken looking after all the hatchlings, which were a light brown colour and darkened with each consecutive instar. Our first specimen to hatch was a male, which had a rather dark red-brick-brown wing band running through the hindwing upperside. No evidence of this wing band continued into the forewing, as in the white and yellow-ochre markings of E.hiarbas angustata and E.dryope angulata. The females have a much lighter beige-brown wing band that continues into the forewings from the hindwings upperside, but remarkably, this is not found in any of the males. We were ecstatic to have bred out ninety-six specimens of which I kept a number of males and females for my private collection. The remainder was released back into the wild at the exact spot where we had captured the original female. We kept of this batch, six males and six females, which we released into our Lepidome, with the hope that they would breed successfully. On the third day after their release into the Lepidome, we found several males and females in cop. All other specimens had vanished. We put this down to having many predators such as lizards, praying mantids and gecko's in the Lepidome. On the fourth day after releasing these butterflies into the lepidome, we found a fresh pair in copulation and removed them into a smaller controlled breeding environment. The second brood of butterflies came from this single pair. There was no transition in any of the specimens suggesting that it could be a form of E. hiarbas angustata.

    Note:It was now decided from this evidence that this butterfly was not the aberrational male, as was believed, but in fact the male to the strange looking female, as seen in the photograph above, them being in cop.

    Second brood - July; I was given seventeen eggs. I bred these through and got twelve beautiful fresh specimens, five females and seven males. I kept for my collection four males and four females and released the last four into the valley where I had originally captured the female. There was no transition in any of the specimens suggesting that it could be a form of E.hiarbas angustata. This second brood's markings on both males and females were much darker and more fused and it was discovered at this point that it was the winter form, whereas the first brood was the summer form, as seen below.

Discovery Of New Forms In

  1. E. dryope angulata, E. hiarbas angustata, E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens and E. vashti (MS)

    It was while I was studying the E. specimens, namely E.hiarbas angustata, E.hiarbas angustata f. flavescens, E.dryope angulata and E.vashti (ms), that it was discovered, that all these Eurytela's have a wet and dry form. On checking all my specimens I found that all the July brood were rather lighter on the undersides in comparison to the patterns of markings found on the April brood on the undersides. Although the uppersides seemed to be all the same. This occurs in all the Eurytela species that I have studied.



    E.hiarbas angustata


    5,6,7 and 8 are discovered to be winter forms or dry forms (DF) never noticed before until the discovery of E.vashti (MS)



    E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens


    13 and 14 are discovered to be winter forms or dry forms (DF) never noticed before until the discovery of E. vashti (MS)



    E. vashti (MS), E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti



    15,16,17 and 18 are part of the first brood E. vashti (MS) which are wet forms (WF) meaning summer months and
    19,20,21,22 are part of the first winter brood which are dry forms (DF) meaning the winter months.
    All specimens were bred at The Butterfly Sanctuary in 2002 by E. Whiteley



    E. dryope angulata


    23,24,25,26,31,32,33 and 34 are discovered to be winter forms or dry forms (DF) never noticed before until the discovery of E. vashti (MS)


    Note: Although we also discovered three distinct forms of E. dryope angulata, this is due to the wing band differences that are constant in the wet forms and differ from the dry forms. E.dryope angulata (wf) has a narrow wing band on the upper hindwing and forewing. The males have a wider wing band. This is found in all the forms of E. dryope angulata.

    Another unusual specimen was captured in July 2005 by Earle Whiteley in Oribi Gorge, that suggests that it is possible for interbreeding between the rare E. hiarbas angustata f. albescens and E.dryope angulata. One of the main differences between the two species is the wing band. The edge of the wing band on the hind wing in E. hairbas angustata f. albescens is straight with no fusion into the prominent ground colour. Whereas in E.dryope angulata the wing band edge closest to the margin on the upperside of the hind wing fuses into the prominent ground colour.


    39 and 40 are discovered to be winter forms or dry forms (DF)

    The underside resembles that of E.hiarbas angustata f. ramsgaticus and the upperside close to that of E.dryope angulata wf (male). This suggests that this could be a hybrid.

Visual Description

Rarity; E. vashti is extremely rare and we only saw two specimens, both being males, during the year 2003. Since then, we have kept a record of sightings to determine the stability of the butterfly in the Ibilanghlolo Valley. This is as follows: 2004 1x male and 3x females; 2005 2x females; 2006 1x male; 2007 1x male and 3x females; 2008 1x male and 1x female; 2009 1x male and 7x females; 2010 1x male; 2011 2x males and 2x females. It is with a difficult realization that this butterfly could easily become extinct due to fires, development or vandalism. It has been necessary that we breed this butterfly, using specimens from the three colonies we have found, so as to keep the gene pool strong and release these specimens after breeding, back into the area from which they were captured. Of the specimens bred, ninety percent are released immediately back into the environment, and the remainder kept for scientific purposes. The last controlled breeding took place in 2007. E. dryope angulata (yellow-orange band) is common, E. hiarbas angustata (white band) is common, E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (narrow yellow-orange band) is extremely rare, E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti (dark brown band) is extremely rare.

Ovum; The ovum of E.vashti (ms) is exactly the same as E.hiarbas angustata and E.dryope angulata, from what I can see. The egg has the same rounded shape, approximately the same size, the same cilia and colour of all the Eurytela's I have seen so far. It is rather impossible to tell any great significant differences using a loop (single lens magnifier) of which I have at my disposal. All the E.hiarbas angustata'sand E. dryope angulata's, have been found to prefer Tragia glabrata, which has rather solid and sharp spines that would give you a healthy burn once it penetrated the skin. While Eurytela vashti (ms) is found so far only on (unidentified host), which has a stem coated with soft hair, almost velvety. The larva of E.hiarbas angustata andE.dryope angulata like to keep hidden on the stems of this prickly plant Tragia glabrata to protect themselves from predators. While on the other hand the larva of E.vashti (ms) like to lie in the centre of the leaf on the main vein of a leaf that has some kind of a black fungus growth (soot-like) covering it. Here their dark brown colour hides them perfectly from the sight of predators. The larva is a dark brown colour and resembles those of E.dryope angulata. But all the appendages of E. hiarbas angustata, E.dryope angulata larva are the same, with E.hiarbas angustata, having green and brown coloured larva of more or less the same ratio in colour. Although in E.dryope angulata there seems to be a smaller ratio of green larva. E.vashti (ms), so far has only produced larva that are dark brown in colour.

Pupae; The pupae are a dark brown colour and resemble those of E.dryope angulata. But all the appendages of pupae are the same, with E.hiarbas angustata, having green and brown coloured pupae of more or less the same ratio in colour. Although in E.dryope angulata, thus far have only given me brown pupae. E.vashti (ms), so far has only produced pupae that are dark brown and no green coloured pupae.

Appearance; Throughout the year.

Distribution

E. hiarbas angustata; Found flying throughout the Afromontane, Lowland and Riverine Forests from Western Cape (Wilderness) along the coast to Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. Also along the escarpment to Mpumalanga, Limpopo Province and further north into Mozambique.

E. dryope angulata; Found flying throughout the Afromontane, Lowland Forests from Eastern Cape (Port St. Johns) along the coast to KwaZulu-Natal and Riverine Forests in Savanna. Also along the escarpment to Mpumalanga, Limpopo Province and further north into Mozambique.

E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens; Found flying throughout the Afromontane, Lowland Forests from Eastern Cape (Port St. Johns) along the coast to KwaZulu-Natal and Riverine Forests in Savanna. Also along the escarpment to Mpumalanga, Limpopo Province.

E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti; Found flying along the South Coast of KwaZulu-Natal in Riverine Forests, Coastal and Sub-Coastal Forests from Trafalgar to Durban.

Flight Pattern


E. dryope angulata (yellow-orange band), E. hiarbas angustata (white band), E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (narrow yellow-orange band), E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti (dark brown band). These butterflies tend to fly in a very jerky manner displaying their appropriated colour band as they glide for a short distance +- 40mm before closing their wings and changing their flight into a different direction of individual choice.

Habitat;
E. dryope angulata (yellow-orange band), E. hiarbas angustata (white band), E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (narrow yellow-orange band), are found playing in small sunlit areas, such as secluded sunlit trails amongst the trees, on the edges of forests and on tree tops. They are very territorial. Females frequent the shaded areas more often to lay eggs.

E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti (dark brown band), is found playing in small semi-sunlit to heavy shaded areas, such as secluded trails amongst the trees and remain most of their lives in the dense undergrowth.

Seasons;
E. dryope angulata (yellow-orange band), E. hiarbas angustata (white band), E. hiarbas angustata f. flavescens (narrow yellow-orange band), E. hiarbas angustata f. vashti (dark brown band). Throughout the year.

Note;
Formtypes are variatypes; all forms or variations described are not recognized scientifically. However this is necessary for one to identify individual specimens that have in some cases a large number or are totally different from each other during seasonal, geographical and intermediate changes.

Specimens Of This Journal

  1. Eurytela hiarbas angustata (male) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  2. Eurytela hiarbas angustata (male) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  3. Eurytela hiarbas angustata (female) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  4. Eurytela hiarbas angustata (female) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  5. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. umbranus (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  6. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. umbranus (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  7. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. umbranus (female) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  8. Eurytela hiarbas angustataf. umbranus (female) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  9. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. albescens (male) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  10. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. albescens (male) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  11. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. albescens (female) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  12. Eurytela hiarbas angustataf. albescens (female) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  13. Eurytela hiarbas angustata f. ramsgaticus (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Rienier Terblanche.
  14. Eurytela hairbas angustata f. ramsgaticus (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Rienier Terblanche.
  15. Eurytela vashti (ms) (male) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  16. Eurytela vashti (ms) (male) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  17. Eurytela vashti (ms) (female) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  18. Eurytela vashti (ms) (female) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  19. Eurytela vashti (ms) f. tsunami (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  20. Eurytela vashti (ms) f. tsunami (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  21. Eurytela vashti (ms) f. tsunami (female) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  22. Eurytela vashti (ms) t. tsunami (female) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  23. Eurytela dryope angulata (male) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  24. Eurytela dryope angulata (male) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  25. Eurytela dryope angulata (female) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  26. Eurytela dryope angulata (female) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  27. Eurytela dryope angulata f. antropus (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  28. Eurytela dryope angulata f. antropus (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  29. Eurytela dryope angulata f. antropus (female) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  30. Eurytela dryope angulata f. antropus (female) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  31. Eurytela dryope angulata f. linthia (male) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  32. Eurytela dryope angulata f. linthia (male) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  33. Eurytela dryope angulata f. linthia (female) upp. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  34. Eurytela dryope angulata f. linthia (female) und. (wf) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  35. Eurytela dryope angulata f. felthami (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  36. Eurytela dryope angulata f. felthami (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  37. Eurytela dryope angulata f. felthami (female) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  38. Eurytela dryope angulata f. felthami (female) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  39. Eurytela Whiteley hybrid (male) upp. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.
  40. Eurytela Whiteley hybrid (male) und. (df) CBISA collection. Earle Whiteley.

Conservation of Butterflies in South Africa Research Material. (30th November 2002, by Earle Whiteley). Updated 2011.

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CBISA invites new individuals who come across this website to become members of this unique Non Profit Company (NPC). The offer is open to you - to assist wherever you feel it is within your capability to do so. There is a membership fee of R250 per month. This membership allows you to take advantage of this website presented by CBISA - which covers a very wide spectrum of all the existing and future planned projects of CBISA as well as allowing you some opportunity to become involved in them - should they be of interest to you. A monthly newsletter is automatically provided for your benefit.

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From Our Gallery


Welcome to S.A Butterflies

A place for rare butterflies to be and to be protected as they are extremely rare. Only a few have ever been caught - but through our breeding program we have been able to breed over one hundred and have released them back into the wild. Thanks to the dedication of a few who cared for their survival - a very rare butterfly - has been described.